Oblivious

Sometime around the age of six I began to grow self-aware — realizing that the things I said and did reflected on my identity and how others perceived me.

As I grew older, that self-awareness (really nothing more than an understanding that your actions and words are logically linked to your person) grew into a pretty normal and robust sense of self criticism.

I’m sure this is fairly standard and across-the-board; most people have the ability to judge their actions and words and overall public persona before they act, speak, or leave the house in the morning wearing nothing but a sock. It’s like looking in the mirror, and in the world of online publishing/blogging, it’s that nagging, sometimes unidentifiable, feeling of dread you get before you click the “Publish” button.

‘Something’s wrong, I don’t know what it is, but I better wait and think about this. Something about this post is just bad, it’ll come to me later.’

That’s what a lot of us do; and then sometime after you eat dinner and come back to it you realize you’ve just written an otherwise innocently intended series of what you once thought were logical comments but ended up saying ‘Hitler was awesome’ or something stunning like that.

Then you click delete, and never speak of it again to anyone. (This is the same reason why it should be a criminal offense to publish a deceased author’s notes, scribblings or drafts without their prior permission).

Then there’s this guy.

After the Game 7 riot in Vancouver, he actually sat down and wrote an article a childish-note telling Vancouver fans that rioting is bad, and that they need to “grow up.”

As you can probably guess, it was fantastic:

…what happened after Game 7 simply is unacceptable, you ruthless Vancouverites…

…Uh, hello? Vancouver? This is the voice inside your head calling—it’s only a game…

All these notions of rioting being un-Canadian have just been tossed in the Pacific Ocean where it unfortunately now belongs.

As an Anaheim Ducks supporter, we would not stoop as low as this tripe. What we do is grab our keys, start our engines and drive back to our own lives. Some of us commute back.

That’s what you could have done, Vancouver…

It goes on, and it’s all stunning.

Where we would be without this masterpiece of moral navigation is anyone’s guess.

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